Thursday, February 19, 2015

Managing Customer Service Satisfaction Is Easy: Make Them an Offer They Can’t Refuse
by David P. Carlisle

Customer service satisfaction is a subject with which we are all very familiar. So familiar, in fact, that we tend not to pay any attention to it, because we’ve seen it all. There’s nothing new.


Well, maybe we are wrong.


I, too, was a jaded been-there-done-that kind of guy until a few weeks ago, when I received a letter from my pickup truck dealer.


I had previously dinged this dealer in a survey when they tried to sell me an air filter double-netted to around $135 retail. The service manager called me up at 7:00 in the morning with hurt in his voice. He apologized, and we remained friends. That was over a year ago.


About a month ago, my daughter took the pickup in for routine service. The service advisor sold her a radiator flush – she accepted, because she trusts this dealership. Then, a few days after the service, I got a barrage of service satisfaction emails. I gave my dealer perfect scores and checked the box that it was OK to share with my dealer, but I commented on my dissatisfaction with the radiator flush. I was honest in saying that I was not satisfied, but knew that the imperfect scores I should have given would have proven overly traumatic to my dealer.


I never heard anything back from the OEM or dealer about my dissatisfaction. Hey, I gave it a shot.


Then, a few weeks ago, I received an offer that I could not refuse: my dealer paid for compliance. They sent me a $25 gift card as a token of appreciation for my “complete” satisfaction.


Let’s Take a Step Back:


I am used to:
  • “Stamps” on my repair order asking me for perfect scores.
  • My service advisor begging for perfect scores and telling me that his income would significantly suffer if they were to get anything but perfect scores.
  • An elderly woman calling me after my service appointment, reading from a script, and asking me if I was less than completely satisfied.
  • The letter from my service manager asking me to call him if I was not completely satisfied.
  • Filling out the dealers’ separate satisfaction survey that seemed designed to encourage score perfection.
  • Finally, getting a manufacturers survey at the end of all this.
  • And, of course, being positive that all this interference simply spoils the soup, rendering the satisfaction survey stupid.
However, I am not used to getting a gift card for $25 in appreciation of my deceit.
To me, the gift card was spot on. I do not have to be bribed to come back to my servicing dealer, but the $25 tells me that he is trying—really hard—to make the factory happy. My dealer’s service manager also wants me to be happy with his operation – he takes great pride in it, but he knows that he really cannot sustain perfection. The $25 is his way of “winking,” and thanking me for “perfect scores.” And, it has nothing at all to do with actual perfect satisfaction.


Bottom Line: The lesson here is that the millions of dollars OEMs spend on what seems to be completely bogus satisfaction surveys actually can make a difference. It is not about the scores themselves — we all know these are useless; it is about things like my dealer’s incredible act of creativity. My dealer chose to thank me for playing the game, rather than simply urging me to lie. Through this interaction, we winked back at one another. As a result of this, our relationship has been humanized, and I am still loyal. Well done.


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